Bolero

  

 

Bolero Music



Bolero Songs at Amazon Mp3



Singer/Band

Song Title

Singer/Band

Song Title

Rafael Basurto

Para Toda La Vida

Luis Miguel

La Mentira

Gilberto Santa Rosa

Como He Podido Estar Sin Ti

Rocio Durcal

Como Han Pasado Los Años

Luis Miguel

La Mentira

Rafael Basurto

No Valio' La Pena

Ricardo Montaner

Besame'

Gloria Estephan

Mas Alle

Diana Krall

The Look Of Love

Gilberto Santa Rosa

No Pense Enamorarme Otra Vez

Bette Midler

Do You Wanna Dance

Ricardo Montaner

Si Tuviera Que Elegir

Luis Miguel

La Barca

Olga Guillot

Vete de mí



  One of five rhythm competition dances in American style ballroom dance competition, the bolero is often called the dance of love. With a classic standard tempo and romantic Spanish guitar enticing even the most novice of dancers, it's not hard to see why bolero music has stood the test of time. Characterized by it's slow rhythm, bolero is graceful and romantic. Similar in tone and history to rumba music, bolero music truly enhances a sense of love and romance unlike anything else on earth.

  Bolero music has a unique history, one that's not altogether clear for most dance historians. With the same Afro-Cuban roots as rumba music, it is believed to have been started in Cuba or Spain, originating in folk dances such as the Danzon and Beguine. Originally, many bolero lyrics came from poetry, and as they were adapted into musical form, the bolero utilized the same poetic style. It began primarily as music accompanied on the Spanish guitar. As the bolero music spread to neighboring Latin American nations (especially Mexico), it has become the quintessential ballad form. Originally performed by Cuban troubadours, or street performers, the single guitar was often joined by other instruments. Lutes were also popular, along with the tres, a six-string steel guitar. Bolero musicians quickly recognized the beauty of the harmonized voices combined with the guitar, and formed duos and trios. The Trio Matamoros, one of Cubas's most prolific groups, made the bolero popular. Decades later, Cuban composers like Jose Antioi Mendez would experiment with the bolero, bringing it to new heights.

  Popularized in the United States in the 1930's, the original Spanish themed bolero was written in ¾ time. In Cuba, the music was changed to 2/4 time before ultimately settling into 4/4 time. Often arranged with Spanish vocals and simple percussion, bolero music frequently showcases exciting guitar, upbeat conga and loud bongos. After the birth of salsa music in New York in the 1970s, the bolero became standard dance music for Americans. The Cuban rhythms combined with Mexican, Puerto Rican and other Latin communities to evolve into what it is today. Bolero music has had a huge influence on popular music throughout the decades. Not limited to just foreign language tunes you might hear on Spanish radio, bolero influences can be heard on songs by the always trendy Madonna (“Live to Tell”) and even in the sentimental Celine Dion (“My Heart Will Go On”). Yes, all of Hollywood seemed to be taken with the theme song from “Titanic.” The song even won an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1997. Even American standards singers like Frank Sinatra were inspired by bolero music on tracks like “From Here to Eternity.” Notably, Canadian jazz artist Diana Krall popularized the bolero on her track “The Look of Love.” Bette Midler, also known as the Divine Miss M, featured bolero influences on her popular song “Do You Wanna Dance.” Bolero truly knows no limitations on genre of music – it can be found virtually everywhere. Of course, bolero music isn't just relegated to pop songs. Classical music versions of bolero music are quite beautiful, and are often featured in ballet dance routines. The composers Debussy, Chopin and Ravel all wrote pieces feature bolero music. Some musicians have begun experimenting with traditional bolero music, fusing it with other types of dance music. The bolero-son is a longtime favorite dance music in Cuba, and is very similar to the rumba. The bolero-mambo is slow and beautiful, with added sophistication of big-band music. The bolero-cha is playful, with many cha-cha-cha lyrics.

  Characterized by it's dramatic lyrics, romantic tone and beautiful Spanish guitar, it's not hard to see why so many musicians chose to utilize the Cuban influences. Ballroom dancers will appreciate the sometimes slow, moody feel that may reflect a budding romance between partners themselves. There was a resurgence in bolero music's popularity in the 1990's, where hispanic teens found themselves dancing to rhythms their own grandparents had listened to fifty years previous. This universality is truly what makes bolero music timeless. Regardless of what year you were born, what country you might be from, or what your own background might be, bolero has inspired virtually all types of singers, musicians, dancers and music lovers around the world. Sources:

"Bolero” description of history, character, basic step and music." Ballroom dance videos & dance DVD's. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Oct. 2011. .
"Explore: Bolero | AllMusic." AllMusic. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Oct. 2011. .
Mauleon, Rebecca, and .. "Bolero Music : National Geographic World Music." Home : National Geographic World Music. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Oct. 2011. .
"Songs of Spain." Dance Teacher 1 Nov. 2010: 77-82. Print.
The Bolero School: an illustrated history of the Bolero, the Seguidillas and the Escuela Bolera ; syllabus and dances. London: Dance Books, 2002. Print.
"What is the Bolero?." wiseGEEK: clear answers for common questions. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Oct. 2011. .





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